Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Children and Youth During the Gilded Age and Progressive Era$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

James Marten

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781479894147

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9781479894147.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 20 October 2019

Model Schools and Field Days

Model Schools and Field Days

Colorado Fuel and Iron’s Construction of Education and Recreation for Children, 1901–1918

Chapter:
(p.42) 2 Model Schools and Field Days
Source:
Children and Youth During the Gilded Age and Progressive Era
Author(s):

Fawn-Amber Montoya

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9781479894147.003.0003

This chapter examines the Colorado Fuel and Iron Company's use of educational and recreational programs to socialize children to become reliable workers as well as “good citizens” during the period 1901–1918. The dramatic growth of immigrant populations in the industrializing United States motivated Progressives to focus on “Americanization” programs that would educate women about health, food preparation, and parenting. The emphasis on Americanizing immigrants grew during the Gilded Age and was adopted by the Progressive reformers working for racial uplift. This chapter discusses the Colorado Fuel and Iron Company's Americanization of immigrant children by creating educational curriculum, establishing kindergartens and gardening programs, and sponsoring field days and sporting events.

Keywords:   immigrants, Colorado Fuel and Iron Company, Americanization, immigrant children, educational curriculum, kindergartens, gardening programs, field days, sporting events, recreation

NYU Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.