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JapanThe Precarious Future$
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Anne Allison

Print publication date: 1953

Print ISBN-13: 9781479889389

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9781479889389.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 29 March 2020

After Fukushima: Veto Players and Japanese Nuclear Policy

After Fukushima: Veto Players and Japanese Nuclear Policy

Chapter:
(p.110) Chapter Five After Fukushima: Veto Players and Japanese Nuclear Policy
Source:
Japan
Author(s):

Jacques E. C. Hymans

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9781479889389.003.0006

In the wake of the nuclear disaster at the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear plant, many observers expected that Japan would decide to abandon nuclear power as a major energy source. Others expected that it would strongly reaffirm nuclear power as a necessary foundation of Japan's prosperity and security. In fact it proved unable to chart a clear long-term nuclear policy direction for three years after the disaster. This policy failure was the result not only of the face-off between the “nuclear village” and public opinion, but also the stalemate between the many entrenched veto players in the nuclear policy arena. Given the large number of veto players, in the future we can expect continued national-level nuclear policy indecision, combined with a gradual restart of bits and pieces of the nuclear estate that find their way through the regulatory and political maze.

Keywords:   nuclear policy, nuclear energy, Fukushima Dai-Ichi, veto players, TEPCO

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