Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
After the Protests are HeardEnacting Civic Engagement and Social Transformation$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Sharon Welch

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781479883646

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9781479883646.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 19 October 2020

“The Lightning of Possible Storms”

“The Lightning of Possible Storms”

Theories of Social Change

Chapter:
(p.42) 2 “The Lightning of Possible Storms”
Source:
After the Protests are Heard
Author(s):

Sharon D. Welch

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9781479883646.003.0003

Once we recognize that a situation is unjust, once we grant the imperative of including the voices and experiences of all peoples, how then do we work together to build just and creative institutions? A twofold form of social engagement, with as much attention to implementation and impact as to critique or vision, is possible because of nuanced histories of successful social movements and of contemporary developments in the behavioral sciences. This chapter explores what it means to live out a theology of liberation from the point of view of the oppressor who genuinely sees the cost of systemic injustice, sees their/our role in perpetuating that system, and commits to using their/our power in solidarity with the oppressed and in the service of equitable human flourishing.

Keywords:   catalytic social engagement, strategic nonviolence, Chenoweth and Stephan, Robin Wall Kimmerer, protests, honor Codes, Kwame Anthony Appiah, criminal Justice Reform, Applied behavioural science, Windigo

NYU Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.