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Narrative CriminologyUnderstanding Stories of Crime$
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Lois Presser and Sveinung Sandberg

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781479876778

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9781479876778.001.0001

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Gendered Narratives of Self, Addiction, and Recovery among Women Methamphetamine Users

Gendered Narratives of Self, Addiction, and Recovery among Women Methamphetamine Users

Chapter:
(p.69) 3 Gendered Narratives of Self, Addiction, and Recovery among Women Methamphetamine Users
Source:
Narrative Criminology
Author(s):

Jody Miller

Kristin Carbone-Lopez

Mikh V. Gunderman

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9781479876778.003.0004

This chapter discusses the functions and uses of gender-based categorizations among offenders by investigating women methamphetamine users’ narratives of self, addiction, and recovery. These narratives are characterized by gendered threads, such as gender-based victimization and rebellion against perceived gendered control. For instance, some women confess that they began consuming the drug after being sexually abused while others argue that their consumption of meth is their radical move toward independence. In addition, a number of the women draw on cultural themes about motherhood and family to make sense of their meth initiation by emphasizing that the drug could enhance their ability to be an effective caretaker.

Keywords:   methamphetamine, gender-based categorizations, gender-based victimization, sexual abuse, cultural themes, caretaker

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