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TroublemakersStudents' Rights and Racial Justice in the Long 1960s$
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Kathryn Schumaker

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781479875139

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: January 2020

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9781479875139.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 07 July 2022

The Right to Equal Protection

The Right to Equal Protection

Segregation and Inequality in the Denver Public Schools

Chapter:
(p.51) 2 The Right to Equal Protection
Source:
Troublemakers
Author(s):

Kathryn Schumaker

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9781479875139.003.0003

This chapter examines a school desegregation lawsuit out of Denver, Colorado:Keyes v. School District No. 1. This case was the first case in which the Supreme Court ruled on the issue of de facto segregation, which involved the separation of students by race that was not directly the result of law. This chapter places the case in its context, in which the Chicano Movement rose to challenge discrimination against Mexican American students in the city’s public schools. The chapter explores the conflicts between the ways that black and Chicano activists pursued justice in education. The chapter argues that Keyes was an important case in the court’s articulation of Fourteenth Amendment equal protection jurisprudence, as the courts limited the kinds of claims that advocates for black and Chicano students could make about the quality of education they received at school.

Keywords:   school desegregation, Fourteenth Amendment, equal protection, Denver, Keyes v. School District No. 1, school desegregation, Chicano Movement, de facto segregation, Mexican American, Supreme Court

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