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Being MuslimA Cultural History of Women of Color in American Islam$
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Sylvia Chan-Malik

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781479850600

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9781479850600.001.0001

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“Four American Moslem Ladies”

“Four American Moslem Ladies”

Early U.S. Muslim Women in the Ahmadiyya Movement in Islam, 1920–1923

Chapter:
(p.39) 1 “Four American Moslem Ladies”
Source:
Being Muslim
Author(s):

Sylvia Chan-Malik

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9781479850600.003.0002

Chapter One is an examination of the earliest known photograph of self-identified Muslim women in the U.S. Taken in 1923, the photo features four African American female converts to the Ahmadiyya Movement in Islam (AMI), a South Asia-based missionary movement that attracted significant numbers of Black women, between the 1920 and 1970s. The chapter offers a multilayered and at times, circuitous account of the histories which produced the photograph, specifically the racial politics of 1920s Chicago, the race and gender politics of Ahmadiyya missionary Dr. Mufti Muhammad Sadiq; and the desires for safety and spirituality that led Black American women to Islam.

Keywords:   Chicago, Migration Bronzeville Ahmadiyya, conversion, safety, respectability

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