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God's GangsBarrio Ministry, Masculinity, and Gang Recovery$
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Edward Orozco Flores

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781479850099

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9781479850099.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 23 September 2021

Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.191) Conclusion
Source:
God's Gangs
Author(s):

Edward Orozco Flores

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9781479850099.003.0008

This concluding chapter revisits the text's argument—that faith-based masculine negotiations facilitate recovery from gang life—and examines its implications. While critical criminologists and sociologists have recognized the efforts, Homeboy Industries and Victory Outreach show only seeds of resistance. The chapter urges a conceptualization of recovery from gang life as a process of turning inward to cope with racism. It reiterates the key findings in this volume: that, despite of gang pasts, Latino recovering gang members seek to cut ties with gang life, build relationships with family members, and land well-paying, formal employment. Recovery is set amid a context of very modest socioeconomic and geographic mobility, which is thwarted by the exclusionary currents of late modernity. As a result, recovery from gang life is not rapid or linear, leading recovering gang members to experience the push and pull of gang life and conventional life.

Keywords:   faith-based masculine negotiations, gang recovery, gang life, Latino gang, Homeboy Industries, Victory Outreach, racism, geographic mobility, modernity

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