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Multiracial ParentsMixed Families, Generational Change, and the Future of Race$
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Miri Song

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781479840540

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9781479840540.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 16 September 2021

How Do Multiracial People Identify Their Children?

How Do Multiracial People Identify Their Children?

Chapter:
(p.37) 2 How Do Multiracial People Identify Their Children?
Source:
Multiracial Parents
Author(s):

Miri Song

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9781479840540.003.0003

This chapter investigates how multiracial people identify their children and what guides their choices. Do participants of various mixed backgrounds differ in how they identify their children? Are the ethnic and racial backgrounds of partners influential in this regard? Furthermore, how important is the physical appearance of children, the generational locus of mixture, and contact with White and ethnic minority family members in shaping the identification of children? While many US studies have focused on how parents in interracial unions racially classify their children, these studies have not investigated how such parents think about or explain their choices, or what meanings they associate with terms such as “mixed,” “White,” “Black,” or “Asian.” Nor have these studies explored the ways in which multiracial people (not “single race” individuals in interracial unions) racially identify their children.

Keywords:   Racial identification, Children, Parents, Interracial unions, Racial appearance, Racial classification

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