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Muslim American CityGender and Religion in Metro Detroit$
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Alisa Perkins

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781479828012

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: January 2021

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9781479828012.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 27 June 2022

Bangladeshi Women and Gender Boundaries

Bangladeshi Women and Gender Boundaries

Chapter:
(p.118) 4 Bangladeshi Women and Gender Boundaries
Source:
Muslim American City
Author(s):

Alisa Perkins

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9781479828012.003.0005

This chapter analyzes how Bangladeshi American women and teenage girls in Hamtramck renegotiate conceptualizations of the public-private divide through ongoing interpretive and explorative spatial practices while referencing religious and cultural frameworks. It discusses how Bangladeshi women across generations organize the gendering of spaces within paid labor, public and private celebrations, streets, mosques, home-based religious gatherings, and schools. The analysis centers on how Bangladeshi women in Hamtramck are self-consciously and actively engaged in a process of negotiating their relationship to urban space, searching to interface with the city and its institutions in ways that maximize their sense of mobility, mastery, and centrality within public, semi-public, and domestic spaces of the city. In doing so, they advance new agendas of cultural citizenship, thus encouraging municipal environments and institutions to become more democratic spaces that represent and uphold the values of those who participate in them.

Keywords:   Bangladeshi American women, Bangladeshi American teenagers, public-private divide, spatial practices, paid labor, mosques, urban space, public space, domestic space, cultural citizenship

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