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Juvenile Justice in Global Perspective$
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Franklin E. Zimring, Maximo Langer, and David S. Tanenhaus

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781479826537

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9781479826537.001.0001

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Juvenile Justice in Muslim-Majority States

Juvenile Justice in Muslim-Majority States

Chapter:
(p.249) 6 Juvenile Justice in Muslim-Majority States
Source:
Juvenile Justice in Global Perspective
Author(s):

Lena Salaymeh

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9781479826537.003.0006

This chapter provides overviews of laws relating to the crimes of minors in three distinct, legal-historical moments: in orthodox Islamic jurisprudence as developed in the late antique and medieval eras (roughly 610–ca. 1250 CE), in modern Islamic legal history (19th and 20th centuries), and in the legal systems of many contemporary Muslim-majority nation-states. “Juvenile justice” is, of course, a modern category, and the objective is not to locate it in historical contexts but rather to understand how premodern Muslim jurists defined minors and dealt with their crimes. The chapter shows that many orthodox Islamic legal traditions on the treatment of children are not applied in contemporary Muslim-majority states.

Keywords:   Islamic juvenile justice system, youth justice, Middle East, North Africa, minors, orthodox Islamic jurisprudence

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