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Preserving South Street SeaportThe Dream and Reality of a New York Urban Renewal District$
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James M. Lindgren

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781479822577

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9781479822577.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 17 September 2021

“Sometimes You Just Can’t Get a Break”

“Sometimes You Just Can’t Get a Break”

How 9/11 Torpedoed the Seaport

Chapter:
(p.259) 11 “Sometimes You Just Can’t Get a Break”
Source:
Preserving South Street Seaport
Author(s):

James M. Lindgren

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9781479822577.003.0011

This chapter examines the impact of 9/11 on the South Street Seaport Museum's historic preservation plans. In 2001, the Seaport received an initial $5 million to rehabilitate Schermerhorn Row and exhibit “World Port New York,” which was expected to open in 2003 and boost Lower Manhattan's tourism. But the terrorist attacks of 9/11 changed everything, crippling Lower Manhattan for years. This chapter considers Robert “Peter” Neill III's retirement as Seaport president in the wake of 9/11, Seaport's strategy of increasing revenue under executive director Paula M. Mayo and chairman Lawrence S. Huntington, and how 9/11 affected the Seaport's Fulton Fish Market and its historic ships such as Wavertree and Peking. It also assesses the Seaport's future prospects.

Keywords:   historic preservation, 9/11, South Street Seaport, World Port New York, Lower Manhattan, Robert Peter Neill III, revenue, South Street Seaport Museum, Fulton Fish Market, historic ships

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