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Distributed BlacknessAfrican American Cybercultures$

André Brock

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781479820375

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9781479820375.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 26 June 2022

(p.267) Index

(p.267) Index

Source:
Distributed Blackness
Publisher:
NYU Press
affect theory, 10–11
affordance analysis, 83–84, 101–3
African American Vernacular English (AAVE), 114, 238–40
Afrofuturism, 15, 29–31, 215–18
afro-optimism, 11, 218
afro-pessimism, 11
algorithms, 159–60
antiblackness:
amongst middle class Blacks, 176;
amongst nonwhites, 98;
as libidinal, 33–34;
overdetermining of Black cyberculture, 36–37;
respectability politics as antiblack, 176–79
Baldwin, James, 234
Baraka, Amiri, 14, 33, 79–80, 122
Blackbird browser:
features of, 50–54, 63–64;
“Give Back” button, 53–54;
history of, 50;
reception of, 58–74
Black cyberculture, 5–7, 24–25, 37, 210, 213;
activism, 6, 30, 86, 182, 226
Black feminism, 16, 35, 173, 216, 230–32
Black identity extremism, 86
Black Lives Matter, 30, 81, 86, 123, 182, 206
Blackness for Sale, 6, 240–41
Black pathos, 229, 237;
as epistemological standpoint, 36–37, 79;
not reducible to Black excellence, 184;
technologically prolific, 126, 135
BlackPlanet, 17–18, 84, 116, 133–35, 247n4
Black technoculture, 210–13, 237–38;
as opposed to Western technoculture, 41
Black technocultural matrix, 75, 226–28;
categories of, 228–40
Black Twitter, 80–81;
Black reception of, 119–21;
communitarianism, 94–95;
content about race, 106;
explainer, 92–93;
facilitated by mobile computing, 90, 103;
homophilic, 90, 93–94, 106;
independent of whiteness, 87;
intentional Blackness, 123;
kairotic dimension, 107–8;
reflexive, 162–67;
ritual drama, 109–10;
as satellite counterpublic sphere, 85–88;
tool for protest, 86–87;
visibility through trending topics algorithm, 81, 83, 90–93, 111–13, 116;
white receptions of, 118–19;
BlackWeb 2.0, 57–58
blogs and blogging, 26, 55–56, 134;
Black cultural blogs, 18, 119, 133;
Black technology blogs, 57, 63–64, 74, 76
call and response, 100, 115
callout culture, 32, 220
Chun, Wendy, 191, 211
code switching, 114
color-blindness, 48–49, 60;
in social science research, 124
context collapse, 24, 110–11, 230
critical race studies, 16, 43, 45
critical technocultural discourse analysis (CTDA), 2, 8–10, 25, 43, 95, 241–42;
interface analysis, 42–45
critical whiteness studies, 45, 95
cultural studies, 27–31 (p.268)
Curry, Ayesha, 184–90, 202
deficit model of technology use, 10, 93, 215, 231, 241
digital commerce and advertising, 42, 47–48, 104
digital divide, 17, 29–30, 40–41, 49, 84, 136–38, 181–82, 215–16
Dinerstein, Joel, 34, 99, 210, 220–24, 226, 229, 232–33
diversity in STEM/industry, 30, 98, 133
dogmatic digital practice, 72–73, 180–85, 188–89, 208–9;
respectability politics as dogmatic, 172–73, 179–90, 195
double consciousness, 7, 12–13, 20–24, 77, 99, 127, 170, 173–74
Du Bois, W. E. B., 7, 12, 16, 20–24, 93, 98–99, 127, 149, 154, 173, 241–42;
“low class, undifferentiated mass,” 20, 24, 239;
Dyer, Richard, 7, 34, 45–46, 48, 78, 97–98, 225, 229
explainer journalism, 92–93
feminist media studies, 129
Firefox, 40, 49–51, 54, 61, 64–65
Fouché, Rayvon, 211–14
Gilroy, Paul, 237–38, 240
glitch racism, 133, 152
Hacking, Ian, on dynamic nominalism, 23
hashtag:
Black memetic subgroups, 203–4;
Black Twitter hashtags, 88, 113–17, 204;
communitarian digital practice, 167–70;
curatorial function, 113;
generic hashtags, 114;
hashtag-as-sign, 112;
history of use, 91, 107;
as hyperlinks, 111, 113, 117;
instrumental analysis of, 111–12;
mapping onto Black cultural performativity, 102;
as ratchet digital practice, 130–32;
reductive analysis of, 106;
as reflexive digital practice, 163–64;
semiotic analysis of, 112–17;
as signifyin’ practice/call and response, 113–16;
Twitter trending topic algorithm, 81–83, 114, 116, 123;
2009 Black Entertainment Television (BET) Awards, 91;
virality, 107, 214;
visibility of Black Twitter, 81–83, 90–91, 122;
weak-tie racism, 161
Hughes, Everett C., on ethnic identity, 22, 96–97, 101, 117, 123
hyperlink:
epistemology of, 132;
hashtag as hyperlink, 111, 113, 117;
user identity, 248n9
instrumentalism, 27, 28, 59, 84–85, 111–12
interface analysis, 42–44, 95, 103–5
intersectionality, 173, 230–32
inventio, 100, 109
jouissance, 31, 33–34
kairos/kairotic, 106–7;
Black kairos, 218–20;
decorum, 108;
meme-production, 205;
technologically mediated, 219–20
Kerner Commission Report (1968), 49
keyboard warrior/slactivism, 188, 199
libidinal economy, 10–11, 31–34;
of racism, 126–27
Lyotard, Jean-Francois, 31–34
memes/memetic:
Black deviance/respectability, 149, 181;
Black memetic culture, 203–6;
Shifman, 204–6;
subgroups/subcultures, 204, 206
Miller, Daniel, and Don Slater, 4–5
mobile digital practice:
affordances of, 142;
digital divide, 137–38;
dogmatic digital practice, 181;
smartphones, 41, 120, 132, 136–44, 247n5–7;
smartphones as third place, 138–40;
Twitter, 90, 117, 120, 123
Moten, Fred, 218, 227, 229 (p.269)
Negro Motorist Green Book, 2–4, 15
Obama, Barack Hussein, 73–74, 137, 181
Pacey, Arnold, 27, 54, 99
paratextual analysis, 55–56, 76, 85
pathos, 34–36;
vs. jouissance, 34–35;
vs. logic/logos, 35;
as produced by interiority, 35–36;
Twitter affords expressions of, 188. See also Black pathos
police brutality, 31–32, 140, 157, 159, 161
political economy, 27–30
preencounter catharsis, 139–41
race:
as informational, 21;
microaggressions, 153–55;
race-as-technology, 191, 211;
race online, 96;
racism as frame, 42, 58, 126, 151, 153
racial battle fatigue, 14–15, 81, 160–62
racial formation theory, 43–45, 117, 230
ratchetry, 126–27, 128;
vs. banality, 129;
as deviance, 130–32;
digital practice, 145–48;
gendered, 129, 247n3;
as pejorative, 144;
in tension with racism, 127, 172. See also hashtag: as ratchet digital practice
receipts, 19, 219–20
respectability politics, 126–27, 171, 173–74;
abnegation, 177–79;
antiblackness of, 176–78;
appropriate technology ownership/use, 136, 138, 181–83;
assimilation, 176–79;
disapproval of Black Twitter, 87;
embrace of modernity, 175–76, 190, 236;
vs. ratchetry, 130–31;
white technoculture, 75. See also dogmatic digital practice
science and technology studies, 16, 35, 242;
Harding, 36;
material semiotic analysis, 5;
technology as text, 25, 95;
Woolgar, 25
signifyin’ practice, 78, 88, 94–95, 100–101, 105–11, 113–14
snaps/playing the dozens, 88–89, 94
standpoint epistemology, 11, 36
technorationalism, 89–90, 199, 208
Telecommunications Act (1996), 181–82
The Root, 191–96
triadic formulation of technology, 27, 54, 97, 99
Trump, Donald J., 33, 85–86, 90, 158, 163
Twitter:
“@” function, 85;
affordances, 101–5;
application programming interface (API), 104;
follows feature, 85, 93–94;
hashtags, 90–91, 111–17;
history of, 102–5;
interface, 82;
trending topics algorithm, 91–92, 111–13, 116;
2009 Black Entertainment Television Awards, 91
weak-tie racism, 155–61, 167
web browser, 39–40, 47–49;
browser vs. mobile affordances, 104–5;
niche browsers, 42, 75–76;
personalization of content, 13;
as racial ideology, 44–45;
as synecdoche for internet, 39;
United States v. Microsoft Corporation (2001), 39, 48;
universal browser, 13, 43, 224. See also Blackbird browser
Western technoculture, 220–26;
Western technocultural matrix, 221–22
whiteness:
as epistemology, 37;
of internet industries, 133;
interpretive flexibility of, 6–7, 21–22, 94, 97–98, 224;
interstitial whiteness, 46–48;
as property, 45–46;
as seminal to American technoculture, 34;
technology as white mythology, 99;
as transcendent, 78;
as universal, 21, 46, 48, 97–98;
as unmarked, 8, 46
Wilderson, Frank, 31–34, 212, 226
Yancy, George, 35–36, 151–52, 228–29 (p.270)