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Diaspora Lobbies and the US GovernmentConvergence and Divergence in Making Foreign Policy$
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Josh DeWind and Renata Segura

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781479818761

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9781479818761.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 18 June 2021

Convergence and Divergence Yesterday and Today in Diaspora–National Government Relations

Convergence and Divergence Yesterday and Today in Diaspora–National Government Relations

Chapter:
(p.239) Chapter Ten Convergence and Divergence Yesterday and Today in Diaspora–National Government Relations
Source:
Diaspora Lobbies and the US Government
Author(s):

Tony Smith

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9781479818761.003.0010

This concluding chapter examines how the United States' place and role in international affairs affects divergent and convergent interests between the government and individual diasporas. It examines three stages of American foreign policy. During the first stage (1900–1941), the attachments of diasporas to homelands engaged in World War I led some diaspora members to oppose both US neutrality toward the war and US support for the creation of the League of Nations. In contrast, the second stage (1941–1989) was a period of convergence brought about largely by the global implications of Cold War politics, which pitted US interests against Soviet communism. In the third and contemporary stage, since the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1989, acceptance of the rights of minorities to organize politically on the basis of racial, religious, or national identities has become increasingly common and has given legitimacy to multiculturalism in domestic politics.

Keywords:   American foreign policy, diasporas, World War I, League of Nations, Cold War politics, multiculturalism, domestic politics

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