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Diaspora Lobbies and the US GovernmentConvergence and Divergence in Making Foreign Policy$
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Josh DeWind and Renata Segura

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781479818761

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9781479818761.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 18 June 2021

The Haitian Diaspora

The Haitian Diaspora

Building Bridges after Catastrophe

Chapter:
(p.185) Chapter Eight The Haitian Diaspora
Source:
Diaspora Lobbies and the US Government
Author(s):

Daniel P. Erikson

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9781479818761.003.0008

This chapter provides a history of the Haitian diaspora's relations with the US government, focusing on two separate but interrelated foreign policy concerns: US relations with the government of Haiti and with Haitian migrants. To ensure stability, the United States has made promoting democracy and economic sustainability the core of its foreign policy. However, it has done so only reactively and intermittently, thereby undermining its policies' effectiveness. This is because Haiti has offered little economic or political strategic value to the United States as an ally since the end of the Cold War. With regard to policies toward Haitian migrants, US policy makers have made refugee crisis prevention a top priority—a goal that has led the government to seek control over irregular flows of boat people and others seeking asylum and residence in the United States.

Keywords:   Haitian diaspora, US government, Haitian migrants, Cold War, refugee crisis

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