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Choosing the Future for American Juvenile Justice$
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Franklin E. Zimring and David S. Tanenhaus

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781479816873

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9781479816873.001.0001

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A Tale of Two Systems

A Tale of Two Systems

Juvenile Justice System Choices and Their Impact on Young Immigrants

Chapter:
(p.130) 6 A Tale of Two Systems
Source:
Choosing the Future for American Juvenile Justice
Author(s):

David B. Thronson

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9781479816873.003.0007

This chapter argues that juvenile justice systems have defining choices on how they work with immigrant youth. They can either place their core mission of working positively with youth ahead of collateral efforts to enforce federal immigration law, or choose affirmative efforts to involve immigration enforcement authorities in the lives of youth. The former choice leverages the equitable flexibility of juvenile systems to improve the lives and well-being of immigrant youth, while the latter disregards the foreseeable immigration consequences, subverting the juvenile justice system's mission of providing an alternative to adult courts and punishments for youth. Hence, these starkly different choices create two systems of juvenile justice.

Keywords:   immigration law, juvenile justice system, immigration consequences, adult courts, immigrant youth

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