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American ConservatismNOMOS LVI$
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Sanford Levinson, Melissa Williams, and Joel Parker

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781479812370

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9781479812370.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 23 June 2021

Segregation, Aggression, and Executive Power: Leo Strauss and ‘the Boys’

Segregation, Aggression, and Executive Power: Leo Strauss and ‘the Boys’

Chapter:
(p.407) 13 Segregation, Aggression, and Executive Power: Leo Strauss and ‘the Boys’
Source:
American Conservatism
Author(s):

Alan Gilbert

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9781479812370.003.0013

This chapter focuses on Robert Goldwin, an American Straussian who became an important conduit for Strauss’s ideas—or, at least, certain versions of them—to power-holders within the U.S. government. When Goldwin became the head of the Public Affairs Conference Center, he took on Strauss as a paid strategic advisor. Goldwin, like some others among Strauss’s students, would later extol extreme centralism or authoritarianism: “executive power” or “prerogative.” Indeed, upholding the equal rights of each citizen is the core of modern political thought or liberalism to which Strauss objected. Ultimately, Goldwin played a powerful role in the rise of the modern Republican Party.

Keywords:   Robert Goldwin, Straussianism, centralism, authoritarianism, executive power, equal rights, liberalism, Republican Party

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