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Kids at WorkLatinx Families Selling Food on the Streets of Los Angeles$
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Emir Estrada

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781479811519

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: January 2020

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9781479811519.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 01 August 2021

“I Get Mad and I Tell Them, ‘Guys Could Clean, Too!’”

“I Get Mad and I Tell Them, ‘Guys Could Clean, Too!’”

Chapter:
(p.99) 5 “I Get Mad and I Tell Them, ‘Guys Could Clean, Too!’”
Source:
Kids at Work
Author(s):

Emir Estrada

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9781479811519.003.0006

Chapter 5 underlines how gender shapes the way this study's girls and boys experience this occupation and how the children and the families create gendered expectations as well as strategies for protection. While both boys and girls work alongside their parents on the street, findings revealed that the daughters of Mexican and Central American street vendors in Los Angeles are more active than the sons in street vending with the family. How do we explain this paradox? A gendered analysis helps explain why girls are compelled into street vending, while boys are allowed to withdraw or minimize their participation. This chapter extends the feminist literature on intersectionality by exploring the world of Latinx teenage street vendors from a perspective that takes into account gendered expectations not only resulting from the familiar intersecting relations of race, class, and gender, but also as a consequence of age as well as of the inequality of nations that gives rise to particular patterns of international labor migration.

Keywords:   gender and migration, gendered labor, intersectionality, international migration, family work relation, intergenerational family dynamics

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