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Protest and DissentNOMOS LXII$
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Melissa Schwartzberg

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781479810512

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9781479810512.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 13 April 2021

No Justice, No Peace

No Justice, No Peace

Uncivil Protest and the Politics Of Confrontation

Chapter:
(p.122) 5 No Justice, No Peace
Source:
Protest and Dissent
Author(s):

JosÉ Medina

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9781479810512.003.0006

This chapter defends a confrontational view of protest that puts civil and uncivil protest in a continuum and argues for the contextual legitimacy of uncivil protest. The chapter argues both against conservative views for which protests are legitimate only if previously authorized and in full conformity with law and order, and against liberal views that allow for civil disobedience but, either for principled or for strategic reasons, allow only for protests that remain civil. I argue that contexts of oppression warrant the use of incivility and mild forms of violence for protesting injustice. Elucidating the history of protests in sports, the activism of Act Up, and the counter-protests of Black Lives Matter, I argue that nonviolent movements of resistance can legitimately use incivility and mild forms of violence while still being committed to the mitigation of violence in the long run.

Keywords:   activism, Black Lives Matter, epistemic injustice, epistemic violence, justice, law and order, protest, responsibility, social peace, violence, nonviolence

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