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Taking Back the BoulevardArt, Activism, and Gentrification in Los Angeles$
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Jan Lin

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781479809806

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9781479809806.001.0001

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Neighborhood Activism and Slow Growth

Neighborhood Activism and Slow Growth

Chapter:
(p.124) 4 Neighborhood Activism and Slow Growth
Source:
Taking Back the Boulevard
Author(s):

Jan Lin

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9781479809806.003.0005

Introduces the rise of neighborhood activism in Northeast Los Angeles in the 1980s against the backdrop of “slow growth” preservation and local control movements in California and around the nation. Case study of Eagle Rock, where The Eagle Rock Association (TERA) led a series of protests against mini-malls, condominiums, mansions and “big box” chain stores, in favor of better coordinated land-use planning preservation of natural and architectural landmarks, and “Take Back the Boulevard” for bikers and pedestrians. The case of Highland Park, where citizen activists and preservationists worked to create a Historic Preservation Overlay Zone (HPOZ) to save historic buildings and better regulate land-use planning. It chronicles the rise of the Friends of the Southwest Museum Coalition to oppose the veritable warehousing of the Southwest Museum and storage of the collection in Burbank by its new owner, the Autry National Center of the West. Examines the internal politics of neighborhood activism, the significant participation of women leaders, and the question of minority participation. The chapter finishes with the political legacy of the slow growth movements of Northeast Angeles, which are expressed through a progressive coalition of neighborhood activist organizations with Democratic Latino city councilmen.

Keywords:   Neighborhood activism, Slow growth, Historic preservation, The Eagle Rock Association, Take Back the Boulevard, Highland Park Overlay Zone, Land-use planning, Friends of the Southwest Museum Coalition, Autry National Center of the West

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