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Critical Dialogues in Latinx StudiesA Reader$
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Ana Y. Ramos-Zayas and Mérida M. Rúa

Print publication date: 2021

Print ISBN-13: 9781479805198

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: January 2022

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9781479805198.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 27 June 2022

Refashioning Afro-Latinidad

Refashioning Afro-Latinidad

Garifuna New Yorkers in Diaspora

Chapter:
(p.223) 17 Refashioning Afro-Latinidad
Source:
Critical Dialogues in Latinx Studies
Author(s):

Paul Joseph López Oro

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9781479805198.003.0018

Central Americans of African descent are in the margins on the histories of transmigrations and political movements in the isthmus and their diasporas. The absence of Black Central Americans in Latinx Studies and Central American Studies is an epistemological violence inherited from Latin American mestizaje. In this chapter, I map out the political urgency to call for a refashioning of AfroLatinidad that dismantles the dangerous allure of ethno-racial nationalism (i.e., Afro-[insert nation-state]) and mappability of Blackness into exclusionary geographies of Spanish-speaking Americas (i.e., “you must be Dominican, because you don’t look Guatemalan”). AfroLatinx Studies insurgency as a remedy to the continued erasure and silencing of Blackness in Latinx Studies opens up new terrains with discursive and epistemological limitations. Drawing on oral history interviews/memoirs, visual cultures, and social media, I demonstrate how transgenerational Garifuna New Yorkers histories and politics of self-making, beginning in the late 1950s to the present, highlight their negotiations and contradictions as they perform their multiple subjectivities as Black, Indigenous, and Latinx.

Keywords:   Garifuna New Yorkers, Black indigeneity, AfroLatinidad, US Black Central Americans, AfroLatinx Studies

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