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Evil Deeds in High PlacesChristian America's Moral Struggle with Watergate$
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David E. Settje

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781479803149

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9781479803149.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Nixon’s Resignation and Final Thoughts

Chapter:
(p.201) Conclusion
Source:
Evil Deeds in High Places
Author(s):

David E. Settje

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9781479803149.003.0007

The resignation of Richard M. Nixon as president of the United States on August 8, 1974, brought immediate reactions from liberal to moderate to conservative Protestants that paralleled one another more than at any other time during the Watergate crisis. To be sure, differences persisted in how they viewed Christian moral and ethical participation in politics, as is revealed by the close look provided in this chapter. But the actual moment of resignation brought a sigh of relief, as well as a desire to move the nation beyond this divisive episode. But August 8 lacked a sense of finality because many unresolved issues continued to trouble Christians, the solutions to which divided conservatives and liberals. Protestants thus decided not to exit the political stage in their commentary despite Nixon’s departure, and they remain enmeshed in it to this day.

Keywords:   resignation, President Nixon, Christians, Protestants, Watergate, moral, ethical

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