Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Getting in the GameTitle IX and the Women's Sports Revolution$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Deborah L. Brake

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780814799659

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814799659.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 28 March 2020

(p.217) Conclusion

(p.217) Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.217) Conclusion
Source:
Getting in the Game
Author(s):

Deborah L. Brake

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814799659.003.0010

This concluding chapter examines how Title IX has been able to navigate and survive the backlash against it. It shows how women's influx into sports has created prime conditions for backlash by challenging the masculinity that sports participation for males has historically cultivated. It also considers the scapegoating of Title IX as the reason why some marginalized men's sports have been cut from university rosters; Title IX's successes and limitations as a law of many feminisms; and Title IX's departure from the liberal feminist model that has been the centerpiece of other sex discrimination laws, as seen in its three-part test for equal participation opportunities. Finally, the chapter looks at prospects for further progress in the future regarding women's sports and gender equality more generally.

Keywords:   backlash, scapegoating, Title IX, men's sports, feminism, sex discrimination, three-part test, equal participation opportunities, women's sports, gender equality

NYU Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.