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Afro-PentecostalismBlack Pentecostal and Charismatic Christianity in History and Culture$
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Amos Yong and Estrelda Y. Alexander

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780814797303

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814797303.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 18 September 2019

Navigating the Territory

Navigating the Territory

Early Afro-Pentecostalism as a Movement within Black Civil Society

Chapter:
(p.43) 3 Navigating the Territory
Source:
Afro-Pentecostalism
Author(s):

David D. Daniels III

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814797303.003.0003

This chapter examines the ways in which Afro-Pentecostalism engaged black civil society, from from the advent of the movement in 1906 to the inauguration of the Second Great Migration in 1942, within the religious context crafted by the five major black denominations. It begins with an overview of concepts of civil society as well as early Afro-Pentecostalism and goes on to discuss how major sectors within early Afro-Pentecostalism utilized formal means to participate in the construction of black civil society. It then considers how early Afro-Pentecostalism interacted with a network of three primary entities—church, school, and lodge—while contesting alliances between the black church and electoral politics as well as the black church and the white establishment. It also explores the content of early Afro-Pentecostalism's civil engagement of dominant social systems within U.S. society, namely, patriotism, patriarchy, and racial segregation.

Keywords:   black civil society, Afro-Pentecostalism, black church, electoral politics, patriotism, patriarchy, racial segregation, black denominations

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