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Fair Trade and Social JusticeGlobal Ethnographies$
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Sarah Lyon and Mark Moberg

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780814796207

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814796207.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 15 October 2019

Naming Rights

Naming Rights

Ethnographies of Fair Trade

Chapter:
(p.283) 12 Naming Rights
Source:
Fair Trade and Social Justice
Author(s):

Jane Henrici

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814796207.003.0012

This chapter draws some conclusions from the case studies presented in this book regarding the local impact of fair trade networks and certification. These case studies highlight the anthropology of fair trade as well as various types of fair trade commodities such as Darjeeling tea, coffee, crafts, and cut flowers. Fair trade proponents often argue that the initiative integrates geographically and culturally distant producers, consumers, and distributors into a single global partnership based on shared values and goals, but research among fair trade coffee producers in Mexico and the buyers of their coffee in the United States casts doubts about such unity. Based on these observations, the chapter outlines a broader path toward a more economically equitable and socially just exchange system at both the global and local levels. In particular, it urges those who sympathize with the goals of alternative trade to articulate a set of universal trading rights, analogous and perhaps related to those of human rights as expressed in the charters of various multinational organizations.

Keywords:   fair trade, certification, commodities, producers, consumers, alternative trade, universal trading rights, coffee producers

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