Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Killing McVeighThe Death Penalty and the Myth of Closure$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jody Lyneé Madeira

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780814796108

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814796108.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 23 September 2021

(p.221) 11 Done to Death

(p.221) 11 Done to Death

The Execution and the End of the Victim-Offender Relationship

Chapter:
(p.221) 11 Done to Death
Source:
Killing McVeigh
Author(s):

Jody Lyneé Madeira

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814796108.003.0011

This chapter examines Timothy McVeigh's execution that put an end to the victim-offender relationship. The day before McVeigh was executed on June 12, 2001, survivors and victims' families who would witness his death live began the long journey from Oklahoma City and elsewhere to Terre Haute, Indiana. Other family members and survivors of the Oklahoma City bombing opted not to attend the execution. This chapter considers how, on the morning of McVeigh's execution, the healing, voluntary relationships that family members and survivors had formed with one another converged with other destructive, involuntary relationships that chained them to the perpetrators. It also describes McVeigh's execution as a modern spectacle and a site of memory work, his gaze prior to his execution which was interpreted by witnesses as confrontational or defiant, and images of his execution.

Keywords:   execution, Timothy McVeigh, victim-offender relationship, survivors, Oklahoma City bombing, memory work, witnesses, victims

NYU Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.