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Shadowing the White Man's BurdenU.S. Imperialism and the Problem of the Color Line$
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Gretchen Murphy

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780814795989

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814795989.001.0001

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American Indians, Asiatics, and Anglo-Saxons

American Indians, Asiatics, and Anglo-Saxons

Ranald MacDonald’s Japan Story of Adventure

Chapter:
(p.187) 6 American Indians, Asiatics, and Anglo-Saxons
Source:
Shadowing the White Man's Burden
Author(s):

Gretchen Murphy

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814795989.003.0006

This chapter analyzes the works of Ranald MacDonald, a Scotch-Chinook descendent of the Northwest fur trade, whose liminal national identity was formed by competing British and American empires. Born in British Oregon, MacDonald's sense of national dislocation resulted from both his mixed blood and the 1846 movement of the U.S.–Canadian border. While MacDonald can be seen as a transnational figure, his efforts to write himself into the diplomatic histories of both the United States and Canadian Great Britain reveal his sustained effort to make his accomplishments legible to state power. The chapter examines MacDonald's revisions to Japan Story of Adventure (1893). In these revisions, MacDonald shadows the white man's burden both by introducing the narrative of a mixed-blood Indian leading the wave of U.S. or British colonization in Asia and by revealing the competing historical and geographical forms of racialization used to identify the mixed-blood people of the Pacific Northwest.

Keywords:   Ranald MacDonald, liminal national identity, national dislocation, mixed blood, Canadian Great Britain, Japan Story of Adventure, white man's burden, British colonization in Asia

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