Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Law's DetourJustice Displaced in the Bush Administration$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Peter Margulies

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780814795590

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814795590.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 29 May 2020

(p.99) 5 Conspiracy’s Discontents

(p.99) 5 Conspiracy’s Discontents

Prevention and False Positives After September 11

Chapter:
(p.99) 5 Conspiracy’s Discontents
Source:
Law's Detour
Author(s):

Peter Margulies

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814795590.003.0006

This chapter examines the Bush administration's conspiracy prosecutions as the cornerstone of a new strategy for prevention after 9/11. It begins with an overview of the history and theory of conspiracy in criminal law and goes on to discuss the problem of false positives. It then considers conspiracy and anti-terror prosecution as an extension of legal detours in government, along with the dangers of using conspiracy as a weapon against terrorism and political violence. It also explains how conspiracy charges can improve public safety while respecting civil liberties, with particular emphasis on the use of internal and ethical criteria and the role of the courts in enhancing accountability and promoting prosecutorial deliberation.

Keywords:   conspiracy prosecutions, Bush administration, prevention, 9/11, false positives, legal detours, terrorism, political violence, courts

NYU Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.