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City FolkEnglish Country Dance and the Politics of the Folk in Modern America$
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Daniel J. Walkowitz

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780814794692

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814794692.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 18 September 2019

Revival Stories

Revival Stories

Chapter:
(p.15) 1 Revival Stories
Source:
City Folk
Author(s):

Daniel J. Walkowitz

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814794692.003.0002

This chapter introduces some of the major threads that weave together to provide the complex fabric that is the history of English Country Dance (ECD) in the twentieth century. After a review of the material conditions in the industrial city at the end of the nineteenth century, in which calls for revival echoed, the chapter moves between themes that interweave at different stages in the history, and often to different effect. The discussion moves from discourses on the body to histories of reform to the folk revival, but one theme is never far from another. Concerns voiced by Progressive reformers over dangers from and to gendered bodies cross with interests in social control and cultural amelioration. And the romantic views of peasants and the folk mix with Anglo-Saxon and white imperial ambitions to revitalize the “race.”

Keywords:   Cecil Sharp, English Country Dance, twentieth century, nineteenth century, folk revival, reform histories, body discourse

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