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Transitional JusticeNOMOS LI$
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Melissa S. Williams, Rosemary Nagy, and Jon Elster

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780814794661

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814794661.001.0001

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Countering the Wrongs of the Past

Countering the Wrongs of the Past

The Role Of Compensation

Chapter:
(p.129) 4 Countering the Wrongs of the Past
Source:
Transitional Justice
Author(s):

Debra Satz

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814794661.003.0005

This chapter explores the role of compensation in repairing historical wrongs, focusing on the standard welfare economist's view of compensation. There are three important points to note about this idea. First, it seems to presuppose a theory in which the only thing that matters is overall preference satisfaction: compensation aims to render an individual as satisfied after as before a loss. Second, it claims that all such satisfactions can be put on a single scale and aggregated into an overall utility function. Third and finally, it suggests that the basis of a claim to compensation arises from the losses to a person's level of satisfaction and not the need to redress a particular wrong.

Keywords:   compensation, satisfaction, loss, utility function, claim

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