Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
This Year's Model"Fashion, Media, and the Making of Glamour"$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Elizabeth A. Wissinger

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780814794180

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814794180.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 19 October 2019

The Job

The Job

Nice Work If You Can Get It

Chapter:
(p.162) 6 The Job
Source:
This Year's Model
Author(s):

Elizabeth A. Wissinger

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814794180.003.0007

While the general public engages in varying levels of it, the models and modeling professionals I spoke to for this study claimed they felt as though they were never off duty and were always at work to produce the right “look” in person, in photographs, and online. Model agents made it clear that it matters where models live, where they eat and shop, and on which airline they travel. As this chapter explores, some respondents reported being told explicitly by their agents they had to put on the show all the time, even if they were just running around the corner to do an errand, mindful of the impression they might make as they are out and about, conscious of their online image created by the photos snapped of them in fashionable neighborhoods or at social events and posted to blogs or websites dedicated to documenting the modeling world. It seems like a lot of work, but models who really want to “make it” report trying to make it look fun to be exposed in this way, to be “on” all the time, to be out there in the spotlight, as often as humanly possible.

Keywords:   Fashion models, Glamour labor, Branding, Free labor, Precarious work, Immaterial production, Self-commodification, Creative economy, Cultural production

NYU Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.