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International AdoptionGlobal Inequalities and the Circulation of Children$
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Diana Marre and Laura Briggs

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780814791011

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814791011.001.0001

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“We Do Not Have Immigrant Children at This School, We Just Have Children Adopted from Abroad”

“We Do Not Have Immigrant Children at This School, We Just Have Children Adopted from Abroad”

Flexible Understandings of Children’s “Origins”

Chapter:
(p.226) Chapter 12 “We Do Not Have Immigrant Children at This School, We Just Have Children Adopted from Abroad”
Source:
International Adoption
Author(s):

Diana Marre

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814791011.003.0013

This chapter explores the implications for international adoptees and for Spanish society of the fact that in Spain, as in the rest of Europe, immigrants and international adoptees come from the same regions, yet international adoption is not treated as an international migration process. For example, a teacher at a prominent primary school in Barcelona said, “we do not have immigrant children, we have children adopted internationally.” Social and legal regulations vis-à-vis non-European immigrants and adoptees differ enormously, as do the attitudes of the native-born population. The chapter examines the complex and ambivalent meanings of “cultural origins” that are articulated by adoptive parents regarding children who do not look like them. The possibility that adopted children might be stigmatized and marginalized as immigrants is the underside of Spanish attitudes toward difference as it binds race to culture.

Keywords:   Spain, cultural origins, immigrants, international adoptees, social regulations, legal regulations, Spanish attitudes

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