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International AdoptionGlobal Inequalities and the Circulation of Children$
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Diana Marre and Laura Briggs

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780814791011

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814791011.001.0001

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The Medicalization of Adoption in and from Peru

The Medicalization of Adoption in and from Peru

Chapter:
(p.190) Chapter 10 The Medicalization of Adoption in and from Peru
Source:
International Adoption
Author(s):

Jessaca B. Leinaweaver

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814791011.003.0011

This chapter explores the transnational influences of biomedical discourse in a study of international adoption from Peru. Scrutinizing the processes that deem children legally adoptable and that certify some parents as fit and condemn others as unfit, the chapter shows that international discourses surrounding children's rights are bolstered by globalized discourses about biomedicine as officials utilize normative notions of mental health and malnutrition in order to deem birth parents guilty of neglect or incapacity. Adoptive parents, too, are deeply enmeshed in the biomedical in their previous failed attempts at assisted reproduction and the medical examinations and tests required of them. The discourse of nation is also shaped by biomedicine, as North Americans and Europeans calculate health risks when choosing a country from which to adopt.

Keywords:   biomedical discourse, biomedicine, Peru, transnational influences, birth parents, adoptive parents

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