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Economics and Youth ViolenceCrime, Disadvantage, and Community$
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Richard Rosenfeld, Mark Edberg, Xiangming Fang, and Curtis S. Florence

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780814789308

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814789308.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 27 November 2021

Aggravated Inequality

Aggravated Inequality

Neighborhood Economics, Schools, and Juvenile Delinquency

Chapter:
(p.152) 6 Aggravated Inequality
Source:
Economics and Youth Violence
Author(s):

Robert D. Crutchfield

Tim Wadsworth

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814789308.003.0006

This chapter explores youth and adult employment patterns in disadvantaged communities, school performance, and delinquency in a nationally representative sample of adolescents. An important result of this study is that neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage conditions the effect of school performance on delinquency. Among students who live in disadvantaged areas, better grades in school are associated with higher delinquency rates, a pattern opposite to that found for students from more advantaged areas and suggesting that the relationship between school performance and violence involvement is conditioned by the neighborhood opportunity structure. This finding should concern policymakers and violence-prevention specialists and echoes the conclusion from the DSG literature review that interventions to prevent youth crime and violence should be multivalent, encompassing the community as well as the families and schools of disadvantaged youth.

Keywords:   disadvantaged communities, school performance, delinquency, employment patterns, violence involvement, neighborhood opportunity structure, youth crime prevention

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