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Economics and Youth ViolenceCrime, Disadvantage, and Community$
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Richard Rosenfeld, Mark Edberg, Xiangming Fang, and Curtis S. Florence

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780814789308

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814789308.001.0001

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Economic Conditions and Violent Victimization Trends among Youth

Economic Conditions and Violent Victimization Trends among Youth

Guns, Violence, and Homicide, 1973–2005

Chapter:
(p.85) 4 Economic Conditions and Violent Victimization Trends among Youth
Source:
Economics and Youth Violence
Author(s):

Janet L. Lauritsen

Ekaterina Gorislavsky

Karen Heimer

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814789308.003.0004

This chapter examines the relationship between changing economic conditions and rates of serious violent victimization among adolescents and young adults between 1973 and 2005. The effects of unemployment, poverty, and consumer sentiment on rates of youth violence are compared by the gender and race-ethnicity of victims. The analysis reveals that increases in youth violence are generally associated with increases in poverty and growing consumer pessimism, but not with increases in unemployment. The effects of poverty and consumer sentiment, however, differ somewhat for males and females and youth of differing ages and race-ethnic groups. Like the previous results presented in this chapter, these findings indicate that the relationship between macroeconomic conditions and youth violence is not simple and is conditioned by the age, gender, and race-ethnicity of victims.

Keywords:   youth violence, gender, race-ethnicity, violent victimization, unemployment, poverty, consumer sentiment, age

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