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Heart-SickThe Politics of Risk, Inequality, and Heart Disease$
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Janet K. Shim

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780814786833

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814786833.001.0001

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The Dichotomy of Gender

The Dichotomy of Gender

Chapter:
(p.139) 5 The Dichotomy of Gender
Source:
Heart-Sick
Author(s):

Janet K. Shim

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814786833.003.0006

This chapter provides two ways in which gender had been be dichotomized by epidemiologists and people with heart disease. First, both of them do not question that gender and sex are binary in nature. For instance, epidemiologists responded with confusion when asked about how they defined or measured “gender” or “sex.” Similar responses are obtained when men and women with heart disease were asked about the measurement of gender. Second, gender is viewed and constructed in fundamentally contrasting ways by epidemiologists and lay people. Epidemiologists overwhelmingly and consistently constructed gender differences in cardiovascular risk as attributable to biological, hormonal distinctions between men and women. People with heart disease viewed these differences as rooted in the structural effects of gendered relations of power and their intersections with race and class.

Keywords:   epidemiologists, sex, gender, gender differences, cardiovascular risk

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