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Heart-SickThe Politics of Risk, Inequality, and Heart Disease$
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Janet K. Shim

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780814786833

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814786833.001.0001

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An Apparent Consensus on Class

An Apparent Consensus on Class

Chapter:
(p.112) 4 An Apparent Consensus on Class
Source:
Heart-Sick
Author(s):

Janet K. Shim

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814786833.003.0005

This chapter discusses the consensus between epidemiologic researchers and people with heart disease on the relevance of social class differences for health. Both groups agree that the consequences of class differences for heart disease resides in the illness' multiple and complex effects, in conjunction with race and gender, on people's exposures to risks—economic insecurity, constrained occupational and educational opportunities, and the stress of living in hostile environments. Moreover, they spoke of class as determining access to heterogeneous kinds of resources like quality medical services, health-related information, and nutritious foods. The chapter ends by considering current epidemiologic conventions regarding the measurement and conceptualization of class forces in shaping cardiovascular risk.

Keywords:   epidemiologic researchers, heart disease, social class differences, race, gender, medical services

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