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At Home in Two CountriesThe Past and Future of Dual Citizenship$
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Peter J. Spiro

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780814785829

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814785829.001.0001

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Dual Citizenship, Declining Citizenship

Dual Citizenship, Declining Citizenship

Chapter:
(p.131) 8 Dual Citizenship, Declining Citizenship
Source:
At Home in Two Countries
Author(s):

Peter J. Spiro

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814785829.003.0009

This chapter describes how dual citizenship will over the long term undermine solidarities located in the state. States may try to put dual citizenship to work as a strategy for cementing diaspora ties, but that doesn’t mean the strategy will be successful. On the contrary, dual citizenship will tend to undermine the intensity of national identities defined by citizenship status. This chapter describes two new forms of instrumental citizenship: Olympic citizenship and investor citizenship. Individuals are gaming citizenship rules to secure eligibility in international sporting competitions. Others are simply buying it. In both cases, formal membership is detached from social connection. Neither would exist without broadened acceptance of dual citizenship. Dual citizenship tends to hollow out citizenship as defining meaningful community on the ground. That has led some to call for policing the status. But it is too late to reverse the material forces that have resulted in its growing frequency and acceptance. Dual citizenship has become a fact of globalization.

Keywords:   Olympic citizenship, investor citizenship, dual citizensip, globalization, diaspora, community, citizenship rules

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