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PsychopathyAn Introduction to Biological Findings and Their Implications$
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Andrea L. Glenn and Adrian Raine

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780814777053

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814777053.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 28 July 2021

Psychophysiology

Psychophysiology

Chapter:
(p.65) 3 Psychophysiology
Source:
Psychopathy
Author(s):

Andrea L. Glenn

Adrian Raine

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814777053.003.0004

This chapter reviews the body of psychophysiological research that has been conducted in psychopathy and discusses how this research has improved our understanding of the neurobiological correlates. One of these is David Lykken's seminal work involving psychophysiological processes in psychopaths. Lykken's studies sought to empirically test the assertion that the main clinical characteristic of psychopaths was a lack of normal emotional responses. Lykken hypothesized that the emotional deficit of psychopaths was specific to emotions such as fear or anxiety. Indeed, he found that psychopathic individuals were not as physiologically responsive when anticipating aversive events such as an electric shock or loud noise. He developed the hypothesis that low fearfulness is one of the primary deficits in psychopathy.

Keywords:   David Lykken, psychophysiological research, psychopathy, psychopaths, emotional responses, emotional deficit, fear, anxiety

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