Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Race, Ethnicity, and PolicingNew and Essential Readings$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Stephen K. Rice and Michael D. White

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780814776155

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814776155.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 19 September 2021

Citizens’ Demeanor, Race, and Traffic Stops

Citizens’ Demeanor, Race, and Traffic Stops

Chapter:
(p.287) Chapter 12 Citizens’ Demeanor, Race, and Traffic Stops
Source:
Race, Ethnicity, and Policing
Author(s):

Robin S. Engel

Charles F. Klahm IV

Rob Tillyer

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814776155.003.0012

This chapter explores the post-stop arrest decision in traffic stops conducted by Cleveland police officers to determine why racial disparities might exist. The study pays close attention to citizen demeanor by examining more than forty-two thousand traffic stops by Cleveland police; as part of their study, officers were also asked to rate citizen demeanor on a scale with values ranging from civil to physically resistant. Multivariate analysis shows that race/ethnicity is no longer a significant predictor of arrest when controlling for other legal and extra-legal variables, including citizen demeanor. Demeanor is a predictor of arrest and failure to account for this influential extra-legal variable represents a serious limitation in prior traffic stop studies.

Keywords:   post-stop arrest, traffic stops, Cleveland police, racial disparities, citizen demeanor, civil resistant, physically resistant, race, ethnicity

NYU Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.