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Race, Ethnicity, and PolicingNew and Essential Readings$
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Stephen K. Rice and Michael D. White

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780814776155

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814776155.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 04 June 2020

Driving While Black

Driving While Black

Bias Processes and Racial Disparity in Police Stops

Chapter:
(p.264) Chapter 11 Driving While Black
Source:
Race, Ethnicity, and Policing
Author(s):

Patricia Warren

Donald Tomaskovic-Devey

William R. Smith

Matthew Zingraff

Marcinda Mason

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814776155.003.0011

This chapter examines the impact of race on the likelihood of being stopped by both the North Carolina Highway Patrol and local police in the state. It utilizes citizen survey data that captures variables that are often missing in traffic stop studies, including measures of self-reported driving behavior. The chapter reveals that race is a significant predictor of traffic stops in the data involving local police, but not in the Highway Patrol data. Race may be less important for the Highway Patrol because their officers are less likely to do routine patrol work, and because race is often difficult to discern when patrolling highways due to the speed of vehicles. The chapter concludes by suggesting that research should be tailored based on the agency under study, and that future research should also focus on officer decision making after the stop has been made.

Keywords:   race, traffic stop, North Carolina Highway Patrol, local police, driving behavior, routine patrol work

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