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Spectacular GirlsMedia Fascination and Celebrity Culture$
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Sarah Projansky

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780814770214

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814770214.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 27 September 2021

“I’m Not Changing My Hair”

“I’m Not Changing My Hair”

Venus Williams and Live TV’s Racialized Struggle over Athletic Girlhood

Chapter:
(p.127) 4 “I’m Not Changing My Hair”
Source:
Spectacular Girls
Author(s):

Sarah Projansky

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814770214.003.0005

This chapter discusses case studies of girls in turn-of-the-twenty-first-century media culture, particularly tennis—a professional sport in which girl athletes often participate. No fewer than fourteen high-profile teens were playing professional tennis in the late 1990s, and soon Venus Williams, Martina Hingis, Anna Kournikova, Amélie Mauresmo and Serena Williams were repeatedly making headlines in both the tennis world and nonsports media. The chapter focuses on Venus Williams and employs two methods of analysis. First, a comparison between coverage of Venus and of other girl players, and second, an emphasis on live/near-live television coverage of her matches. The chapter draws attention to the specific racialization of Venus' persona and the various instances in which she seems to be challenging racism in both the media coverage and the tennis world.

Keywords:   girl athletes, tennis, Venus Williams, Martina Hingis, Anna Kournikova, Amélie Mauresmo, Serena Williams, racialization

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