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Brown Boys and Rice QueensSpellbinding Performance in the Asias$
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Eng-Beng Lim

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780814760895

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814760895.001.0001

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G.A.P. Drama, or The Gay Asian Princess Goes to the United States

G.A.P. Drama, or The Gay Asian Princess Goes to the United States

Chapter:
(p.137) 3 G.A.P. Drama, or The Gay Asian Princess Goes to the United States
Source:
Brown Boys and Rice Queens
Author(s):

Eng-Beng Lim

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814760895.003.0004

This chapter presents scenarios of conquest in Gay Asian Performance (GAP) drama—a mock assemblage of puns, wayward Asian identifications, and queer acts on improper routes and cartographies—which is parodied through the figure of the rice queen who is desperately in love with the diasporic gay Asian male in the United States standing in for the native boy. The scenarios' real and parodic native-ethnic transmogrification points to the racial legacies of the queer dyad in the postcolonial and diasporic borderzones of Singapore, China, Thailand, and Asian America. Such a campy reading opens up a new set of questions about the “bewitching politics” of “transcultural magic”, and the mutually “constitutive spells” that the dyad “casts” in the production of art in the Asias.

Keywords:   Gay Asian Princess, native-ethnic transmogrification, diasporic borderzones, transcultural magic, Asias

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