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Passions and EmotionsNOMOS LIII$
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James E. Fleming

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780814760147

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814760147.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 28 May 2022

Democracy and the Nonsovereign Self

Democracy and the Nonsovereign Self

Chapter:
(p.226) 8 Democracy and the Nonsovereign Self
Source:
Passions and Emotions
Author(s):

Sharon R. Krause

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814760147.003.0008

This chapter evaluates Marcus's theory of affective intelligence, noting some inconsistencies in his account of how the different systems of neural processes are related to one another. In his essay, Marcus aims to “provide a unified account of how preconscious and conscious neural processes serve democratic politics.” However, the relationship between these two processes is ambiguous. What is needed is a clearer, more coherent account of human agency. To sustain its significance for politics and morality, the theory of affective intelligence needs to show how a potent, nonmechanistic form of human agency is possible without the sovereign subject. In particular, the theory needs a clearer account of how deliberation can involve preconscious processes without being strictly determined by them, both with respect to stimulating deliberation and to the activity of deliberative reasoning itself.

Keywords:   affective intelligence, preconscious neural processes, conscious neural processes, human agency, nonsovereign human agency, deliberation, deliberative reasoning

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