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Celluloid SermonsThe Emergence of the Christian Film Industry, 1930-1986$
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Terry Lindvall and Andrew Quicke

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780814753248

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814753248.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 20 October 2019

Conclusion

Conclusion

A Modest Renaissance before the End

Chapter:
(p.203) 9 Conclusion
Source:
Celluloid Sermons
Author(s):

Terry Lindvall

Andrew Quicke

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814753248.003.0009

This chapter explains how the efforts of a new generation of Christian filmmakers to offer interesting and challenging films sparked a modest renaissance as progressive distributors searched for fresh products. This rebirth would be short-lived, however, due to the impending demise of the 16mm Christian film distribution network and the subsequent rise of videotape. While the Christian film market maintained its separation from Hollywood, it was aware of the trends in the larger industry. Rather than imitating the secular behemoth, it focused on preaching sermons, reporting on missions, and teaching the faithful, using the goals of communication practiced by the church for millennia. With the education of film school graduates in the 1980s, Christian filmmakers tapped into technical and narrative strategies practiced by Hollywood. Yet, Christian filmmaking lingered on the fringes of cultural impact, rarely inviting either broader critical awareness or economic influence.

Keywords:   Christian filmmakers, Christian film market, Hollywood, 16mm Christian film, videotape, industry trends, cultural impact

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