Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Global Flow of InformationLegal, Social, and Cultural Perspectives$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Ramesh Subramanian and Eddan Katz

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780814748114

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814748114.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 29 March 2020

Piracy, Creativity, and Infrastructure

Piracy, Creativity, and Infrastructure

Rethinking Access to Culture

Chapter:
(p.54) 4 Piracy, Creativity, and Infrastructure
Source:
The Global Flow of Information
Author(s):

Lawrence Liang

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814748114.003.0004

This chapter offers an insight into how copyrights are perceived in emerging economies, particularly India's. On one hand, governments in emerging economies adhere to international laws in the hope of benefitting from increased trade with developed economies on which they rely on for exporting their products. On the other hand, their private citizens participate in a parallel, gray economy almost entirely devoted to creating pirated versions of movies and music in complete breach of all existing international laws. The chapter frames the issue of copyright violations as one pertaining to access to knowledge and a right to livelihood, claiming that piracy actually increases the visibility of the works and thus may promote future sales of such works.

Keywords:   copyrights, emerging economies, piracy, international laws, copyrights violations

NYU Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.