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Circuits of VisibilityGender and Transnational Media Cultures$
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Radha S. Hegde

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780814737309

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814737309.001.0001

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The Gendered Face of Latinidad

The Gendered Face of Latinidad

Global Circulation of Hybridity

Chapter:
(p.53) 3 The Gendered Face of Latinidad
Source:
Circuits of Visibility
Author(s):

Angharad N. Valdivia

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814737309.003.0003

This chapter examines the gendered face of Latinidad as it is transported, manipulated, and articulated by popular media networks under the contemporary conditions of globality. Latinidad, the process of being, becoming, and/or performing belonging within a Latina/o diaspora, challenges many popular and academic categories of ethnicity, location, and culture. As a cultural and conceptual framework, Latinidad enables a more nuanced reading of the disjuncture between the lived realities and commodified constructions of hybridity. The global presence and mobility of the Latina/o population has led to significant reconfiguration of the U.S. national imaginary with regard to race, gender, ethnicity, and sexuality. In particular, the heterogeneity of the Latina/o population has unsettled a deeply entrenched black and white racial system which is embedded in various types of institutional and social discourses. Indeed, the transnational lives and cultural hybridity of Latina/os and Latinidad exceed national boundaries and disrupt conventional categorizations of race.

Keywords:   Latinidad, globality, hybridity, racial systems, Latino population, media networks, U.S. national imaginary

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