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Circuits of VisibilityGender and Transnational Media Cultures$
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Radha S. Hegde

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780814737309

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814737309.001.0001

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Dial “C” for Culture

Dial “C” for Culture

Telecommunications, Gender, and the Filipino Transnational Migrant Market

Chapter:
(p.212) 12 Dial “C” for Culture
Source:
Circuits of Visibility
Author(s):

Jan Maghinay Padios

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814737309.003.0012

This chapter shows how the overseas Filipino community is transformed into a transnational migrant market. Advertisements and marketing campaigns to Filipinos overseas reinforce Philippine state-based discourse that frames labor migration as a source of Philippine national development and overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) as modern heroes. These neoliberal characterizations privilege the notion that Filipino labor migration functions as a demonstration of familial love and a path to social mobility, rather than a neocolonial process of racial and gender exploitation. As such, they represent efforts by state and market actors to make Filipinos' individual and familial aspirations compatible with the large-scale neoliberal fantasies of Philippine national development and a global free market. Philippine state and corporate actors are similarly invested in the continued reproduction of Filipino labor migration and the transformation of Filipino workers and their families into transnational consumer subjects.

Keywords:   overseas Filipino community, transnational migrant market, Filipino labor migration, overseas Filipino workers, Philippine national development, Filipino workers, transnational consumer subjects

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