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Legal Intellectuals in ConversationReflections on the Construction of Contemporary American Legal Theory$
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James R. Hackney

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780814737071

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814737071.001.0001

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Critical Race Theory/Law and Literature

Critical Race Theory/Law and Literature

Chapter:
(p.113) 5 Critical Race Theory/Law and Literature
Source:
Legal Intellectuals in Conversation
Author(s):

Patricia Williams

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814737071.003.0006

This chapter presents an interview with Patricia Williams, the James L. Dohr Professor of Law at the Columbia University School of Law. Professor Williams uses literary and legal theory to investigate a host of contemporary concerns, particularly with regard to race and gender. Her interest in the role of race in the United States has led her to be associated with the critical race theory movement, which began its ascendancy in the legal academy as Professor Williams was rising to prominence. Topics covered during the interview include her undergraduate educational experience; why she chose literature or the essay format to write about and conceptualize law; her transition from practicing law to the academy; her role in the institutional development of critical race theory; and her thoughts on the current state of the legal academy.

Keywords:   race, gender, Columbia University School of Law, legal theory, critical race theory movement, Patricia Williams

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