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Guadalupe in New YorkDevotion and the Struggle for Citizenship Rights among Mexican Immigrants$
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Alyshia Galvez

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780814732144

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814732144.001.0001

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On Citizenship, Membership, and the Right to Have Rights

On Citizenship, Membership, and the Right to Have Rights

Chapter:
(p.16) 2 On Citizenship, Membership, and the Right to Have Rights
Source:
Guadalupe in New York
Author(s):

Alyshia Gálvez

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814732144.003.0002

This chapter outlines the theoretical framework that structures this book's analysis and also describes the methodology of the study and demographic characteristics of Mexicans in New York. It assumes an understanding of the ways that individuals negotiate their belonging and, by extension, their rights and responsibilities in a polity; a process that articulates personhood while also producing collectivities. As such, any individual may enjoy membership in multiple collectivities which are engaged or latent, depending on the circumstances. Looking at the range of memberships that are more operational than “belonging” and less bureaucratic than “citizenship,” one can see that there are many competing visions which imply both rights and entitlements, obligations and privileges. These memberships are given weight and nuance by the vectors of identity discussed further in the chapter: Guadalupan devotion, Mexican national identity, and undocumented immigration status.

Keywords:   citizenship, collectivities, Guadalupan devotion, Mexican national identity, undocumented immigration status, theoretical framework

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