Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Torah QueeriesWeekly Commentaries on the Hebrew Bible$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Gregg Drinkwater, Joshua Lesser, and David Shneer

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780814720127

Published to NYU Press Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.18574/nyu/9780814720127.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM NYU Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.nyu.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of NYU Press Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NYSO for personal use.date: 25 May 2020

From Whom Do We Learn History? Why Queer Community Needs Texts More Than Other Communities

From Whom Do We Learn History? Why Queer Community Needs Texts More Than Other Communities

Parashat Devarim (Deuteronomy 1:1–3:22)

Chapter:
(p.231) Forty-Four From Whom Do We Learn History? Why Queer Community Needs Texts More Than Other Communities
Source:
Torah Queeries
Author(s):

David Shneer

Publisher:
NYU Press
DOI:10.18574/nyu/9780814720127.003.0044

This chapter describes the Parashat Devarim of Deuteronomy, which features Moses recounting a history of the Jews' experiences over the past forty years. He recount the story of the Israelites' Exodus from Egypt, the gaining of the commandments, and then the many struggles of their sojourn in the desert. In particular, Moses admonishes that their journey is not always a glorious history—despite a few miracles and triumphs, the wandering in the desert was largely marked by struggle, failure, and disappointment. This act of exhortation must be upheld by queer people as well. Given that LGBT people do not have family members to pass their traditional values on the younger queer community; queers must resort to books and community elders as the “bearers of their historical consciousness.”

Keywords:   Parashat Devarim, Deuteronomy, LGBT people, queer people, queer community, Moses

NYU Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.